Setting goals

From the archives

Did you know we are doing an archive dump on Facebook, multiple videos coming out! Including this one - why do we teach the way we do? As we prepare for the new phase of Pramek, we are releasing some of the Pramek archives, some funny, some...

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A New Interview with Matt

Ready for some mind-blowing radio? Learn about the founding of Pramek, what makes it different, Matt's new venture with Pastless and his new book UNDO! Click below and listen as Matt steps into The Midnight Ocean! https://soundcloud.com/user-897774271/with-mathew-powell...

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Science. A head start.

 

Recently I read a post by an MMA instructor stating, ‘Why are people making things more difficult than they are?  Punch someone in the face…a punch is a punch, a face is a face.  It’s not all this biomechanics and thought.  Don’t overcomplicate what you are doing.’Conceputalized View Final

I chuckled, wondering how many times this instructor had competed and watched a fight tape of an opponent…or perhaps trained for a specific hold because he saw a weakness in an upcoming opponent.

We aren’t overcomplicating anything – we are looking for one thing:  a head start.  A short cut.  Or, as some people say these days, a ‘hack.’

The above diagram is from our manual in combatives learning, CLM1:  Efficient Perceptual Learning (which is undergoing an revision currently!)  Available here:  http://pramek.com/p-shop/product/clm-manual-1-efficient-perceptual-learning/

I often speak of combat being a machine, like a car.  When your car breaks, you take it to a mechanic.  The mechanic doesn’t look at the car, he looks at the systems within the car to find what to fix.

Looking at the diagram, we see the break down in how Pramek approaches combat – with a goal in mind.  Not mindless swinging, not punch and a face – but a goal.  We take the goal, develop a strategy to reach it, and then employ methods and tactics to achieve our goal.  The idea being that if you know what you goal is, you can work toward that goal, position and control the fight to get there – while your opponent adapts to you.

When reason meets procedure…

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If you’ve read the CLM on conceptual learning, you know when I talk about procedural based learning (PBL) I have certain views on it.

One area where I truly believe in and practice it is in firearms.

The fine motor skills required to operate a firearm require PBL.  There is no question when you watch Aaron Cowan that PBL is the primary ingredient to firearms mastery.  Unlike martial art, firearms mastery is a different animal when it comes to neurology and how you learn.

An unfair advantage

seesaw-leverage

Recently while teaching in Portola CA a student said to me, ‘I use leverage all the time.’ I said to the student, ‘But do you understand it?’
I had him show what he does on a much larger student and it was unsuccessful. He was repeating what he was taught but did not understand why he was taught it.

‘Using’ mechanical leverage in martial art is not enough…for every strong fighter, there will be a stronger fighter.

‘Understanding’ mechanical leverage, we access the greatest equalizer: physics. It is the understanding of mechanics and mechanically based execution that creates an unfair advantage.

Fighting in confined spaces!

Pramek's newest, 'Against the Wall', releases! We are pleased to announce the release of our newest instruction, 'Against the wall: Fighting in Confined Spaces.' In this 2 hour instructional video, Matt Powell shoots in three locations teaching the science, movement, and methods of fighting in confined spaces. Moving...

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Shieldmaiden

Recently, at a Pramek seminar

Recently, at a Pramek seminar

A friend of mine recently began studying a great martial art, and he wanted to show me some of the techniques he had been training on.  We had been checking out Combative Striking and he had to show me his new style.

After working out for a while (and being someone else’s tackling dummy) he was quite proud of his new found hobby.  We sat on the floor of his basement and I asked him…

‘Have you shown your wife?  Can she do this?’

He looked at me, confounded, and said, ‘Why would I show her?  She’s got me, the dog, a handgun, rifle.’

I asked had he shown it to his sister, his mom, his 10 year old daughter.

Eventually he ran out of weapons, bodyguards, extreme scenarios that I am pretty sure turned his dad into Delta Force, and he said, ‘You know, I don’t even know if _wife’s name_ could do this against a robber.’

Bingo.